PET Scan 14 Aug 2020

Well it’s an adventure today, I am off to UCLH for a PET Scan and I have decided to go by train and tube. The PET Scan is a follow up on the Lutetium treatment I have been having and will take a look inside to see how things are. My PSA has been stable at around 90 and the scan will help decide what I do in regards to treatment.

Of course my big dilemma was what to wear and take, it was cooler than it has been and wet. In the end I opted for shorts and a light fleece and a waterproof which should cover all options. Then I needed masks, gloves, etc.

I left a little early as I hadn’t been on the train for a while and I knew that there was building work going on at the station. I was pleasantly surprised that I got parked very easily and used my Blue Badge to get a disabled parking space close to the station entrance. That said the car park was not busy so I guess not many people are using the train.

At the train station

The train was not that busy so I found a seat and settled down for the first part of my journey.

The train to Tottenham Hale was quick and smooth. 

On arrival at Tottenham Hale things had changed a little as there was also building work going on there.  But my transition onto the tube was also quick and easy.

Tottenham Hale was not that busy as you can see.

Going down

The tube train itself was a little busier and would fill up as we go into the city.  The tube was very hot so shorts were a good choice.

I arrived at the hospital early with the view that I would get a blood test before my scan.  I  made my way to the first floor and found where the blood tests were done. I normally have blood tests done in the Macmillan Cancer Centre but would try the main building .

I took a ticket and waited .

No luck and I had to give up and head to Nuclear Medicine for my scan.  If I can I will try for a blood test after the scan.

I arrived at Nuclear Medicine at the right time and filled in the questionnaire.

It was not long before I was taken to a prep room and fitted with a cannula. Sounds simple but it took three attempts to get it in, the actual penetration of the needle is not too bad, it’s the wiggling it around to get the needle into the vein that gets me!

Once the cannula was fitted I was then injected with the radioactive element that would be attracted to the cancer and then show up on the scan, showing the tumours and there size, in the past they had reduced in size.

Third time lucky getting the cannula in!
The radioactive injection comes in a heavy lead box.

I had then to wait an hour for the radiation to circulate around my body before the scan.

The lights in my room are lowered so there is only one thing to do…  zzzz.

The hour passed quite quickly and I was soon in the scanning room.  I had difficulty lying flat on the bed which hard but managed to get into a position I could hold.

Once more I closed my eyes and slowly I moved through the scanner.  Fortunately this was nice and quiet, not like a MRI.

A radiation sensor in the hall shows the background radiation and the lower shows it when I put my hand over it.

Then it was time to get dressed and go.

I decided not to go for a blood test after all I don’t know when my next outpatients appointment is yet and so will try and get a blood test closer to that date so it is more relevant .

The journey home was quick and easy.

All I need to do now is wait for the results of the scan.

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